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Government consults on intensive energy use

14 March 2012

The government is calling on intensive energy users and trade bodies to help it target businesses likely to be affected by energy and climate-change policies.


Such policies may see average electricity prices paid by large energy intensive users surge to 28 per cent by 2020, according to a statement by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Bis).

The government is asking companies and trade bodies to share information and data about their energy use in support of the Energy Intensive Industries (EII) Package.

This aims to reduce the impact of energy and climate change policies on the cost of electricity for those energy intensive industries whose international competitiveness is most affected by them.

Once sufficient data is gathered, the government will formulate policy, consulting in September this year, for implementation in Spring 2013, subject to state aid rules.

“Businesses impacted by rising energy prices will have the opportunity to provide information and data that will shape a £250 million government scheme aimed at alleviating their electricity bills,” the Bis statement said.

“The government is committed to ensuring that manufacturing is able to remain competitive during the shift to a low-carbon economy,” said Business Secretary Vince Cable.

Businesses interested in providing evidence are asked to visit:

www.bis.gov.uk/carbon-price-floor-compensation


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Government consults on intensive energy use

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